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15 Awesome Craft Beers in a Can

15 Awesome Craft Beers in a Can


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Thank Oskar Blues of Lyons, Colo., for serving Dale’s Pale Ale in a can back in 2002. Ten years later, there are dozens of craft breweries making their beer available in cans.

But why cans? Doesn’t it ruin the taste of the beer? Actually, just the opposite is true. No light can get inside, which means a canned beer will never be light struck, or skunked. Environmentally, cans are more easily and more often recycled than glass, and because cans are lighter, they take less energy to ship. Finally, cans are much more portable and can go many places where glass cannot.

In no particular order, here are my top 15 craft beers in a can.

The Alchemist Heady Topper Double IPA

Heady Topper by The Alchemist brewery in Vermont is a fantastic and well-crafted double IPA. Not only is it one of my top beers from a can, it’s one of my top favorites in general. Heady Topper is a smooth and well-rounded double IPA with a hop bouquet that is floral, herbal, dank, grainy, and full of citrus. What is amazing about this beer is the similarities to fresh grapefruit juice: intense aroma, pithy bitterness, a tinge of sweetness, and a slight touch of sour.

Maui Brewing CoCoNut Porter

If it weren’t for craft beer in a can, Maui Brewing’s beer would not be available on the mainland. The lightweight can makes it economical for Maui to ship their award-winning beer. CoCoNut Porter is made with toasted coconut, which makes it a lot like a gourmet version of an Almond Joy candy bar. It’s dark, rich, smooth, and silky with aromas and flavors of fragrant coconut, dark chocolate, coffee, cola, and nuts. It is the perfect blend of a well craft porter with coconut added as a special treat.

Oskar Blues Ten Fidy Imperial Stout

These pioneers of craft beer in a can have several of the best available, including their 10.50 percent "Ten Fidy" imperial stout. Although this beer looks like motor oil with a head like espresso créma, it is truly a treat of a beer, like rich, gourmet dark chocolate syrup. Ten Fidy tempts you with the aroma of brownies, fresh-baked oatmeal cookies, and freshly made espresso. It sounds like dessert, but it is still very clearly beer with roasty malt flavors and 98 IBUs of bitterness, which is as bitter as many double IPAs.

Oskar Blues also makes another one of my favorites G’Knight (also known as Gordon Beer/Ale), which is a hoppy imperial red ale.

Click here for more canned beer favorites.

— David Jensen, Menuism


Scaling Beer Recipes for Commercial Use with BeerSmith

I am often asked about using BeerSmith for Craft brewing and in fact BeerSmith is used by a large number of commercial breweries. Also, many passionate home brewers who make the leap from home to professional brewing then write and ask how to scale up from 5 gallons to 3 barrels or more? So I thought I would provide this article to explain the process.

The Pilot Brewing System

Most craft breweries develop and test recipes on a “pilot” brewing system, which can range in size from 5 gallons (19 liters) to several barrels in capacity. Even for professional brewers, every idea they have in beer may not be a great one, so the pilot batch lets them test and perfect a recipe before scaling up. They don’t want to be left with an experiment that went wrong on a commercial scale.

Commercial brewers maintain two equipment profiles in BeerSmith – one for their test/pilot system and one for their production system. Then they use the “Scale recipe” command and select the larger system to scale their recipes up to full scale.

Setting up an equipment profile for a large system is not much different than the small one – you just need to enter the correct volumes/weights/losses for the larger system, and then of course go through a process of adjusting and tweaking the profile until it matches up well with your actual brewing process and volumes. There are, however, several key considerations that come into play when developing an equipment profile for commercial scales:

Recipe Scaling Considerations

  • Hop utilization is much higher at craft brewing scales, because large boils simply extract more bitterness. This is the largest change that hits most new craft brewers. If you simply scale up a 5 gallon (19 liter) batch to craft brewery sizes you will get a beer that is way too bitter. The “Hop Utilization Factor” listed in your equipment profile is the number you adjust to correct this. By default it is 100% for batches under 20 gallons (80 liters), but it can easily be 125%, 150% or possibly more for a multi-barrel brewing system. Unfortunately I can’t offer a hard guideline here since each system is different, but you can consult the manufacturer or other brewers using similar systems to get a starting point for scaling your hop utilization.
  • Brewhouse/total efficiency is usually higher for a commercial system – perhaps 1-5% higher depending on the system. This is due to the fact that you will often get better extraction of sugar from the wort both in the mashing and lautering phase that you get on a small pilot system. This is a number you may have to dial in a bit as you gain experience with your particular setup.
  • For really high gravity beers (like barley wine or imperial IPA) you may need additional adjustments to total efficiency (usually downward) for that particular recipe since the mash efficiency and efficiency scaling can be much different than a traditional brew. This is due to the fact that you are mashing/sparging with significantly less total water relative to the amount of grain you have added to this large batch. This is an effect you will also see on smaller batches – your brewhouse efficiency will go down for very high gravity beers.

That’s it – if you set up your equipment profiles properly you can use “Scale Recipe” to select the new equipment
profile and scale everything up.

Thanks for joining me on the BeerSmith Home Brewing Blog. You can get a trial version of BeerSmith here if you don’t already have one. Be sure to sign up for my newsletter or my podcast (also on itunes…and youtube…and streaming radio station) for more great tips on homebrewing.


Megan Jones

Florida Keys Brewing Company in Islamorada, FL has a great selection and I 10/10 recommend getting a flight of up to ten because why not? You can try a selection ranging from IPA to Stout, and leave feeling like a craft beer genius. One beer recommendation is Queen of the South, a vanilla cream ale, which is great for The Keys atmosphere.


2)Irish Car Bomb

You might think you’ve never had a beer cocktail before, but if you’ve ever had an Irish car bomb (lets face it who hasn’t), truth is, you have. The Irish Car Bomb is a classic, and boozehounds and frat boys have been drinking it for decades, but it’s especially acceptable on St. Patrick’s day.

To make the perfect Irish Car Bomb:

  • In a pint glass fill 3/4 of the way full with Guinness
  • Fill shot glass 3/4 full of Jameson whiskey (Or Bushmills if your a cheapskate) into a shot glass
  • Top that shot glass with some Bailey’s Irish cream
  • Drop the shot glass into the pint and chug, and we mean chug till you’re done my friend

We like this cocktail so much we decided to make an awesome Jameson inspired Irish Car Bomb gift basket , and Irish Car Bomb BroBox , check them out.


15 Awesome DIY Crafts to Try with Your Kids

Running out of ideas what to do with your kids this weekend? Before you dive into the depths of Pinterest to discover the latest DIY activity for kids, let us save you some time and show you the hottest picks.

Indoor activities to kill the boredom and get your kids thinking creatively – pick your favorite and leave a comment below which one are you going to try!


The 15 Most Important Craft Breweries in Europe

Where once American beer drinkers looked to Belgium for craft brews, today, America leads the world in craft beer, with the largest number of diverse breweries than any other country in the world. Over the past few decades, however, a handful of breweries have led the way toward building, reviving, shocking, and expanding the European craft beer scene. These European breweries have broken from Old World traditions and stepped up to the plate, thanks to skill and passion, quality and flavor, popularity and influence towards positive change.

If you&aposre already familiar with the most important craft beer in America, then you had better familiarize yourself with some of Europe&aposs top brewers. Large and small, modern and traditional, from the sunny Mediterranean all the way up to the Arctic Circle, they can be found anywhere, and there seems to be no slowing down the train of excellent craft beer offerings popping up all over Europe. Here, in no particular order, are 15 pioneering craft brewers in Europe that any serious craft beer fan should know.


The 5 Best Craft Beer Clubs of 2021

  • Best Overall:Beer Drop
  • Best Variety:Craft Beer Kings
  • Best Domestic:Beer Across America
  • Best Splurge:The Rare Beer Club
  • Best International:The International Beer Club

Best Overall : Beer Drop

Every element of the Beer Drop member experience is just plain fun. At signup, new members are prompted to select five of their favorite beer styles that will go in their first custom box (malty, Belgian, fruit-forward, dark, hoppy, and more), and the next step gives a choice of three subscription formats.

On the more affordable and no-frills end, there’s the standard Beer Drop box, which costs about $40 per month and includes two servings of beer for each of the five chosen categories. The middle-of-the-road option, Beer Drop Plus, is around $50 monthly and is essentially the Beer Drop box with a few choice perks: upgrades on two of the five beer selections, the freedom to swap the selected beers out for some of your own choices, and on top of that, you’ll sometimes see more than two servings per category.

The top tier membership level is Beer Drop Ultimate, which clocks in at about $65 per month and offers all of the perks of the Beer Drop Plus membership, plus upgrades on all five categories. You can also access special releases and taproom-only brews through Beer Drop Plus and Beer Drop Ultimate all membership levels come with personalized recommendations and $5 flat-rate shipping. If you decide that you’d like to change your membership, you can do so at any time.

Best Variety : Craft Beer Kings

Variety is the spice of life for Craft Beer Kings, a Los Angeles-based retailer and subscription service created for lovers of craft beers of all kinds.

To get started, you’ll choose one of the many available themes IPA, stout, sour, barrel-aged, and hazy are just a few of the options to pick from, with a handful of combination themes also available in case you don’t want to stick to just one style. All of the subscriptions start at about $60 per month for a six-can shipment (aside from the barrel-aged beer club, which costs around $150 for six bottles), and shipping is always included, which is a huge plus.

The only downside is that there are no options to change the shipping frequency or to select a set amount of deliveries—if you only want three boxes, for example, you’ll have to wait until the third package arrives and then cancel before you’re charged for the next one.

On the other hand, the à la carte selection is out of this world, so you can always do a bit of freestyle shopping between boxes. All clubs through Craft Beer Kings are shippable to most states.

Best Domestic : Beer Across America

If you’re a fan of award-winning and hard-to-find domestic beers, free shipping, and swag, Beer Across America should be right up your alley.

This club has been around since 1992, and it has this down to a science from all angles. Every month, you’ll receive 12 American craft beer bottles along with a complimentary personalized bottle opener in every box. Combined with roughly a $40 per month price tag, which doesn’t seem to be inflated to cover the included shipping (judging by market standards), these guys almost seem too good to be true.

Within each box, the selection breaks down into varieties from two featured breweries, which you can read up on via the Beer Across America newsletter, highlighting the breweries’ history and each bottle’s tasting notes, fun facts, and the like. Best of all, you’re not locked into this subscription in any way—you can skip a box or cancel your membership at any time without penalty, or you can get in touch with their top-rated customer service team seven days a week for help.

Want to send this as a gift (to someone other than yourself)? The process is simple and straightforward, and your recipient will be notified via a custom announcement on the same day.

Best Splurge : The Rare Beer Club

Founded by late beer critic Michael James Jackson, The Rare Beer Club’s name pretty much says it all.

Every month, members receive two, four, or six 750-milliliter bottles of hand-picked, limited release artisanal beers from places both common and unexpected in terms of beer production. Its whole philosophy, aside from bringing you bottles you might not be able to discover on your own, is to incorporate variety into everyday beer drinking in every sense of the word.

This club pays close attention to keeping each shipment’s bottles diverse from one another in style and country of origin, and it strives to strike a balance between domestic and international selections. The same applies to the month-by-month selection process, meaning you’ll see that continuity in every box.

One of the best features of The Rare Beer Club is its Personalized Shipment Program wherein members can preview upcoming bottle selections and change things up (or skip a month completely). The idea theoretically is that “you’ll never get a beer that you [don’t] want.” The two-bottle monthly subscription costs about $39 per month, while the four-bottle option comes out to roughly $56 monthly, and the six-bottle shipments are around $73 per month.

Subscribers can choose the number of boxes they’d like to receive or gift or can opt for an ongoing membership. There are also other options for delivery frequency in case monthly is too often for your taste. Either way, be sure to keep an eye out for promo codes, as they often pop up on the website.

Best International : The International Beer Club

The International Beer Club

Let’s say you’re exclusively interested in checking out beers from outside the United States—there’s a club for that. From the very same people behind Rare Beer Club comes every imported beer nerd’s dream: regular deliveries of craft beers from faraway lands like Scotland, Ireland, England, Germany, Belgium, the Czech Republic, and more, all selected by an expert panel with more than 100 combined years of experience in the field.

To put it into perspective, this team tastes more than 500 beers annually, and under 20% of that actually ends up on members’ doorsteps. As a result, you can expect to see words like small-batch, seasonal, exclusive, and collaborative surrounding these ultra-high-quality beers.

Pricing for this club is $38 a month for a dozen 12-ounce bottles, and shipping is $15. And, like its rare beer counterpart, a free bottle opener comes with orders of three shipments or more, as well as information on flavor profiles, breweries, and things of that nature.

In addition to The International Beer Club and The Rare Beer Club, these guys also offer several other beer-themed clubs, including The U.S. Microbrewed Beer Club, The Hop-Heads Beer Club, and a hybrid club featuring both international and domestic beer selections. Outside of beer (in case you like to have a snack alongside your brew), they’ve also got a cheese club and chocolate club, to name a few, as well as an option to design your own experience.

What Are Craft Beer Clubs?

A craft beer club is just like any recurring product delivery service, just with a focus on small, passionate brewers versus larger name brands. These clubs are typically easy and straightforward to use—you’ll choose the format that best suits your needs and preferences and receive your selection on a regular basis.

You can also gift a craft beer subscription to someone else as a fun and creative gesture, especially when you’re struggling to choose a gift for a beer lover who already has it all (nobody can argue with a box of curated cans or bottles showing up on their doorstep every month.) Often, these subscription services will offer membership flexibility, meaning you can cancel or skip boxes without penalty and dive in without worry.

How Much Do Craft Beer Clubs Cost?

Craft beer clubs tend to hover around the same range when it comes to pricing—you’re generally looking at around $40 per box, and then there’s shipping (most beer subscriptions do not include it, so that’s something to consider).

Shipping tends to range from about $5 per box on the lower end and roughly $15 on the higher side of things, though of course there will always be an outlier here and there. There are many services to choose from, each at their own price points. We’ve simply curated our top picks to help get you started.

Which Types of Craft Beers Are Included in a Craft Beer Club Subscription?

This completely depends on the type of club you choose. It’s all about your preferences and goals—do you want to discover new international beers or expand your domestic beer knowledge and palate? Do you prefer cans or bottles? Are you an IPA person or do you prefer a stout? Let these questions guide your selection process, and you’ll find a club that suits your needs, whether from or outside of this list.


Macro Brewery vs. Micro Brewery vs. Craft Brewery — What is the Difference?

You’ve probably heard of the terms microbrewery, macrobrewery, and craft brewery, but do you fully understand the differences between them? Continue reading to learn how craft beers differ from macro beers and all the characteristics that are considered when classifying a brewery.

By The Beer Community on Jan. 15, 2019

The titles micro-brewery, macro-brewery, and craft brewery are all terms used to describe a type of brewery. These brewery classifications are all used to differentiate a brewery’s beer production amount and the rules they must follow when brewing. Let’s get a little more in depth…

What is a Microbrewery?

The term micro-brewery describes the beer production amount. In order to be considered a micro-brewery, a brewery must follow a list of requirements.

  • A micro-brewery can produce no more than 15,000 barrels (or 460,000 US gallons) of beer per year.
  • According to The Brewers Association, a micro-brewery must sell 25% or more of their beer on site. This can be easy for micro-breweries as a lot of the double as a brewpub, restaurant, or bar.
  • Micro-breweries are mostly known for brewing “specialty beers”. They are primarily small-bath “boutique” beers, which are sometimes brewed only for a season or event, and usually crafted to showcase a special ingredient.

So, in short, a microbrewery is a brewery that produces less that 15,000 barrels of per year.

So What’s a Nano-Brewery?

A nano-brewery is a brewery that makes even less beer per year than a microbrewery, although there has not been a number of gallons/barrels defined yet in order to classify breweries as nano-breweries.

What is a Craft Brewery?

The term “craft brewery” was created to define micro-breweries that have grown into larger-scale breweries.

  • In order to be considered “craft”, a craft brewery must produce less than 6 million gallons per year.
  • A craft brewery must be owned independently. This means that 25% or more of the company is not owned by an outside party.
  • When a craft brewery brews their flagship beers, they must use traditional ingredients, such as malts, barley, water, yeast, and hops. If a craft brewery wishes to use adjuncts in their brewing, it must be for flavour profile purposes and not cost-cutting purposes like big macro-breweries do.

Craft Brewery vs. Microbrewery: Let’s Summarize…

A craft brewery and a micro-brewery are not the same thing. However, a craft brewery can be categorized as a micro-brewery if they brew less than 460,000 gallons a year. A micro-brewery can only be categorized as a craft brewery if it follows the craft brewing standards.

To read more about craft beer, and the craft brewing standards, click here.

What is a Macrobrewery?

A macro brewery is a large, national or international brewery that produces and distributes more than 6 million barrels of beer per year. Macrobrew is mass-produced beer that is brewed in very large quantities, which is why it generally sells for a cheaper price than craft beer.

Can you really taste the difference between macro beers and micro/craft beers?

Check out this video below where the guys from BAOS Podcast do a blind taste test of craft and macro lager beers. The beers they try are Coors Banquet, Budweiser, Miller Lite, Amsterdam Brewing‘s 3 Speed Lager, Common Good Beer Company‘s The Sociable Pilsner, and the Trailer Park Boys Freedom 35 Lager. Can they taste the difference? Watch to find out!

Microbrewery, Micro-Brewery or Micro Brewery?

To be honest, we’re not 100% sure. However, Google told us that it is one word, spelled microbrewery, but we’ve noticed a variety of spellings throughout brewery websites. Here at JustBeer, we are not the grammar/spelling police, so much as we are socially-savvy, search-engine friends and beer geeks who like to use all versions of microbrewery spellings. Cheers!


Dark Lord Russian imperial stout from Three Floyds Brewing Co. of Munster, Indiana

A huge crowd again waited for the release of this 15 percent ABV beer on April 25, the only day of the year the beer was available.

The annual release party is known as Dark Lord Day, and also features live music and food. The 2015 version of the beer was made with coffee, Mexican vanilla and Indian sugar.

The beer was Indiana’s choice in the #BeerInsider 50 states stout travel guide. The brewery was founded by brothers in 1996.


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Ever try your luck at homebrewing? It can be a frustrating hobby, but also quite rewarding with the end result exceeds expectations. Beginning homebrewers and others usually need guidance and there are several books ready to steer your homebrewing in the right direction. One good example is Craft Brew: 50 Homebrew Recipes from the World’s Best Craft Breweries.

This guide starts off with some educational material. It talks about ingredients, equipment, and the brewing process step by step. Once the necessary background information has been covered, the book launches into the recipe sections. It sorts the recipes by style and with each recipe, it spotlights a specific beer from a specific brewery, complete with background information on the brewery followed by a list of needed ingredients to create a similar beer in your own home.

I’ve done a little homebrewing in my day and I like books that provide well- written, easy to understand instructions and advice. With this book, the first few chapters are adequate, as they do let you know the basics about ingredients, equipment, and the process of brewing beer. The equipment section includes good illustrations and descriptions and I like how the book makes simple yet useful recommendations on the better equipment for certain tasks, showing how a little bit of extra investment makes a difference. Where I do have some issues with this book is with the recipes. It’s cool how they present recipes that attempt to clone specific beers and the added background information on each brewery is fun, even it only trivial in nature. But the remainder of the recipe only shows what you need in terms of ingredients, proper temperature, etc. There is no step- by- step instructions in the recipe section. You are expected instead to have read and followed closely the chapter that explains how to follow the recipes.

Is this approach sufficient? For some, yes, this is good enough. But for others, having step by step instructions for each recipe would be better. It would make for a smoother beer making experience and, most importantly, it would show when/where in the recipe things need to be tweaked a little from the standard recipe formula. Those who already have some homebrewing experience should be fine because, through their own trials and errors over the years, they already know when they need to tweak. For beginners, the lack of specific step by step instructions could be problematic.

Overall, however, I do find this book good for finding recipe clones and it’s great for the homebrewer who wants to mimic his/her favorite beer. The illustrations in the recipe section are nice, too, because each shows a bottle or can of the actual, specific beer along with a poured glass. This not only looks nice, it’s also handy for identifying a beer you have tried and liked. You may not recall the name of a beer you tried and liked last month, but many of us beer drinkers will quickly recognize the bottle or can and thus the illustrations do make a difference.

Homebrewing can be an enjoyable hobby and Craft Brew: 50 Homebrew Recipes from the World’s Best Craft Breweries is a good book to own and refer to when you brew. It does have a few shortcomings, but it is still a useful volume for the homebrewing enthusiast.

Ever try your luck at homebrewing? It can be a frustrating hobby, but also quite rewarding with the end result exceeds expectations. Beginning homebrewers and others usually need guidance and there are several books ready to steer your homebrewing in the right direction. One good example is Craft Brew: 50 Homebrew Recipes from the World’s Best Craft Breweries.

This guide starts off with some educational material. It talks about ingredients, equipment, and the brewing process step by step. Once the necessary background information has been covered, the book launches into the recipe sections. It sorts the recipes by style and with each recipe, it spotlights a specific beer from a specific brewery, complete with background information on the brewery followed by a list of needed ingredients to create a similar beer in your own home.

I’ve done a little homebrewing in my day and I like books that provide well- written, easy to understand instructions and advice. With this book, the first few chapters are adequate, as they do let you know the basics about ingredients, equipment, and the process of brewing beer. The equipment section includes good illustrations and descriptions and I like how the book makes simple yet useful recommendations on the better equipment for certain tasks, showing how a little bit of extra investment makes a difference. Where I do have some issues with this book is with the recipes. It’s cool how they present recipes that attempt to clone specific beers and the added background information on each brewery is fun, even it only trivial in nature. But the remainder of the recipe only shows what you need in terms of ingredients, proper temperature, etc. There is no step- by- step instructions in the recipe section. You are expected instead to have read and followed closely the chapter that explains how to follow the recipes.

Is this approach sufficient? For some, yes, this is good enough. But for others, having step by step instructions for each recipe would be better. It would make for a smoother beer making experience and, most importantly, it would show when/where in the recipe things need to be tweaked a little from the standard recipe formula. Those who already have some homebrewing experience should be fine because, through their own trials and errors over the years, they already know when they need to tweak. For beginners, the lack of specific step by step instructions could be problematic.

Overall, however, I do find this book good for finding recipe clones and it’s great for the homebrewer who wants to mimic his/her favorite beer. The illustrations in the recipe section are nice, too, because each shows a bottle or can of the actual, specific beer along with a poured glass. This not only looks nice, it’s also handy for identifying a beer you have tried and liked. You may not recall the name of a beer you tried and liked last month, but many of us beer drinkers will quickly recognize the bottle or can and thus the illustrations do make a difference.

Homebrewing can be an enjoyable hobby and Craft Brew: 50 Homebrew Recipes from the World’s Best Craft Breweries is a good book to own and refer to when you brew. It does have a few shortcomings, but it is still a useful volume for the homebrewing enthusiast.


Watch the video: ΑΛΦΑ Μπύρα Home Tour (June 2022).